• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

st Sigismund
Roman Catholic parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese
Poland

  • st SIGISMUND: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection

LINK to Nu HTML Checker

WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJA
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas, source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org
    own collection
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas, source: www.bikop.eu, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    source: www.bikop.eu
    own collection
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas, source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org
    own collection

surname

SWINARSKI-PORAJ

forename(s)

Nicholas (pl. Mikołaj)

  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas - Commemorative plaque, Mary Magdalene parish church, Czarnków, source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    Commemorative plaque, Mary Magdalene parish church, Czarnków
    source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org
    own collection
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas - Commemorative plaque (cenotaph), cemetery, Lubasz, source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    Commemorative plaque (cenotaph), cemetery, Lubasz
    source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org
    own collection
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas - Commemorative plaque, Underground Resistance State monument, Poznań, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    Commemorative plaque, Underground Resistance State monument, Poznań
    source: own collection
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas - Underground Resistance State monument, Poznań, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    Underground Resistance State monument, Poznań
    source: own collection
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas - Underground Resistance State monument, Poznań, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    Underground Resistance State monument, Poznań
    source: own collection
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas - Commemorative plaque, town hall, Czarnków, source: mpn.poznan.uw.gov.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    Commemorative plaque, town hall, Czarnków
    source: mpn.poznan.uw.gov.pl
    own collection
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas - Altar, Martyrs' Chapel, St Peter and St Paul cathedral, Poznań, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    Altar, Martyrs' Chapel, St Peter and St Paul cathedral, Poznań
    source: own collection
  • SWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas - Commemorative plague, altar, Martyrs' Chapel, St Peter and St Paul cathedral, Poznań, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSWINARSKI-PORAJ Nicholas
    Commemorative plague, altar, Martyrs' Chapel, St Peter and St Paul cathedral, Poznań
    source: own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Gniezno and Poznań archdiocese (aeque principaliter)
more on: www.archpoznan.pl [access: 2012.11.23]
Military Ordinariate of Poland
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20]

honorary titles

honorary canon (Gniezno cathedral)
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.11.14], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.11.14]

date and place of birth

29.07.1874

Dębe (Czarnków county)

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

13.12.1903 (Gniezno)

positions held

parish priest of Czarnków parish (1911‑39), honorary chaplain of Łubieński’s chapel in Gniezno archcathedral (1930‑9), f. vicar of St Martin in Poznań (1909‑11), Holiest Heart of Jesus in Jeżyce–Poznań (1904‑9) parishes, Greater Poland Uprising 1918‑9 participant

date and place of death

09.02.1940

KL Sachsenhausen

cause of death

extermination: exhaustion and starvation

details of death

After receiving message of the outbreak of Greater Poland Uprising of 1919‑9 organised in Czarnków a clandestine founding meeting and took an oath from congregated insurgents. After German invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the II World War arrested on 03.09.1939 by the Germans. Interned in Lipka transit camp. Beaten and tortured. From there, at the end of 09.1939, moved to Albatros transit camp in Piła. Finally transported to KL Sachsenhausen concentration camp where perished.

perpetrators

Germans

others related in death

ADAMCZYK Stanislaus, BRZĄKAŁA Victor, BURCZYK Felix, BYTOF Peter, CHARSZEWSKI Ignatius, CHYLARECKI Stanislaus, CIEMNIAK Louis, CYBULSKI Stanislaus, CZAKI Saturnin, CZAPIEWSKI Joseph Leonard, DEMSKI Vladislav, DOERING Alexander, FIGAT Henry, GOŃCZ Bernard, GORAL Vladislav, GRZEBIELEWSKI Joseph, GUZ Joseph Adalbert (Fr Innocent), HEVELKE John, HINZ Francis, HINZ Thaddeus, JARZĘBSKI Stanislaus, JORDAN Boleslaus, KALINOWSKI Theodore, KARAMUCKI Edmund Vladislav, KARCZYŃSKI Cyril Methodius, KAŹMIERCZAK Bronislaus, KLEIN John, KOMPF January, KONKOLEWSKI Joachim, KOWNACKI Bronislaus, KOZUBEK Roman, KRAUZE Edmund, KRUPIŃSKI Louis, KUBIAK John (Bro. Norbert Mary), KUBICKI Steven, KUBISTA Stanislaus, KUPILAS Francis, LAPIS Casimir, LENART John, LICZNERSKI Constantine, ŁOSIŃSKI Bernard Anthony, MACIĄTEK Stanislaus Peter, MARCHLEWSKI Leonard, MATUSZEWSKI Francis, MĄKOWSKI John, MĘŻNICKI Joseph, MICHNOWSKI Marian John, MITRĘGA Francis, MORKOWSKI Edmund, MOŚCICKI Joseph, NAGÓRSKI Paul Adalbert, NITSCHMANN Adam Robert, NOWAŃSKI Anthony, NOWICKI Alexander, OCHOŃSKI Charles (Fr Chris), OKOŁO-KUŁAK Anthony, PALUCHOWSKI Boleslaus, PETRYKOWSKI Steven, PIASZCZYŃSKI Michael, PODLASZEWSKI Francis, POMIANOWSKI Vladislav, RADTKE Steven Boleslaus, SĄSAŁA Theodore, SKOBLEWSKI Mieczyslav, SKOWRON Casimir, SOCHACZEWSKI Bronislaus Peter, SYNOWIEC Boleslaus, SZUKALSKI John, SZYMAŃSKI Bruno, ŚLEDZIŃSKI Joseph, TUSZYŃSKI Joseph, TYMIŃSKI Anthony, WAWRZYNOWICZ John, WĄSOWICZ Sigismund, WIERZBICKI Sigismund Lawrence, WIERZCHOWSKI Fabian Sebastian, WILLIMSKY Albert, WŁODARCZYK Ignatius, WOHLFEIL Robert, WRÓBLEWSKI Bronislaus, ZAWISZA Valentine, ZIELIŃSKI Paul, ZIEMSKI Alexander, ZIENKOWSKI Vaclav, ŻUCHOWSKI Vaclav

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

KL Sachsenhausen (prisoner no: 3726): In KL Sachsenhausen concentration camp, set up in the former Olympic village in 07.1936, hundreds of Polish priests were held in 1940, before being transported to KL Dachau. Some of them perished in KL Sachsenhausen. Murderous medical experiments on prisoners were carried out in the camp. In 1942‑4 c. 140 prisoners slaved at manufacturing false British pounds, passports, visas, stamps and other documents. Other prisoners also had to do slave work, for Heinkel aircraft manufacturer, AEG and Siemens among others. On average c. 50,000 prisoners were held at any time. Altogether more than 200,000 inmates were in jailed in KL Sachsenhausen and its branched, out of which tens of thousands perished. Prior to Russian arrival mass evacuation was ordered by the Germans and c. 80,000 prisoners were marched west in so‑called „death marches” to other camps, i.e. KL Mauthausen–Gusen and KL Bergen–Belsen. The camp got liberated on 22.04.1945. After end of armed hostilities Germans set up there secret camp for German prisoners and „suspicious” Russian soldiers. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2018.11.18])

ZL Albatros: German transit Germ. Zivilgefangenenlager (Eng. camp for civilians) in Piła, operational in 09‑12.1939, mainly for Polish teachers and religious, who were treated especially rough, before transporting them to KL Sachsenhausen concentration camp, and for Jews. Prisoners were forced to slave in German manufacturing plants and local farms. Altogether more than 500 Poles were held captive there. (more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2019.11.17])

Lipka: Transit camp for POW and important Poles from Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) voivodship set up by Germans in 1939. (more on: mpn.poznan.uw.gov.pl [access: 2013.12.04])

Intelligenzaktion: (Eng. „Action Intelligentsia”) — also Germ. Unternehmen „Tannenberg” (Eng. „Tannenberg operation”). Extermination program of Polish elites, mainly intelligentsia, executed by the Germans right from the start of the occupation in 09.1939 till around 05.1940, mainly on the lands directly incorporated into Germany but also in the so‑called General Governorate where it was called AB‑aktion. During this genocide Germans methodically murdered c. 50,000 teachers, priests, landowners, social and political activists and retired military. Further 50,000 were sent to concentration camps where most of them perished. (more on: mpn.poznan.uw.gov.pl [access: 2013.12.04], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.10.04])

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. „The war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2015.09.30])

Greater Poland Uprising: Military insurrection of Poles living in Posen Provinz (Eng. Poznań province) launched against German Reich in 1918‑9 aiming to incorporate lands captured by Prussia during partitions of Poland in XVIII century into Poland, reborn in 1918. Started on 27.12.1918 in Poznań and finished with total Polish victory on 16.02.1919 by a ceasefire in Trier. Many Polish priests took part in the Uprising, both as chaplains of the insurgents units and members and leaders of the Polish agencies and councils set up in the areas covered by the Uprising. In 1939 after German invasion of Poland and start of the II World war those priests were particularly persecuted by the Germans and majority of them were murdered. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2016.08.14])

sources

personal:
www.wtg-gniazdo.org [access: 2012.11.23], polacywberlinie.pl [access: 2013.05.19], ecclesiazdziejowwielkopolski.amu.edu.pl [access: 2013.12.04]
original images:
www.wtg-gniazdo.org [access: 2012.11.23], www.bikop.eu [access: 2016.08.14], www.wtg-gniazdo.org [access: 2012.11.23], www.wtg-gniazdo.org [access: 2012.11.23], www.wtg-gniazdo.org [access: 2012.11.23], mpn.poznan.uw.gov.pl [access: 2016.03.14]

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