• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

st Sigismund
Roman Catholic parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese
Poland

  • st SIGISMUND: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection

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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJA
  • WELIK Paul, source: www.russiacristiana.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOWELIK Paul
    source: www.russiacristiana.org
    own collection

surname

WELIK

forename(s)

Paul (pl. Paweł)

  • WELIK Paul - Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg, source: ipn.gov.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOWELIK Paul
    Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg
    source: ipn.gov.pl
    own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Lutsk diocese
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.05.19]
Zhytomyr diocese
more on: www.catholic-hierarchy.org [access: 2019.02.02]

date and place of birth

27.03.1872

Polubicze
Biała Podlaska Cou., Lublin voiv., Poland

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

28.05.1903

positions held

administrator of Nowogród Wołyński parish, f. parish priest of Kotelnia in Zhytomyr deanery (from 1912), Leszczyn in Zhytomyr deanery, Zbrzyż in Kamieniec Podolski deanery (1906‑10) parishes, f. vicar of Krasne in Yampil deanery (1904‑5), f. theology and philosophy student at Theological Seminary in Zhytomyr (1899‑1903)

date and place of death

12.03.1942

KarLag labour camp
GULAG slave labour camp system, Ilyichevka, Kazakhstan

cause of death

extermination

details of death

After Polish–Russian war of 1920 and Riga truce that ended it remained in Russia (on Ukraine). Arrested by the Russians on 10.02.1935 (or 29.07.1935) in Nowogród Wołyński together with 18 Catholics, among them Fr Stanislaus Jachniewicz and Fr Nicholas Szczepaniuk from Zhytomyr. Held in Zhytomyr and next in Kiev prison and there on 14.05.1936, in a group trial of 19 Catholics, sentenced to 5 years of slave labour in Russian concentration camps — Gulag by the genocidal Special Council NKVD kangaroo court (known as „Troika NKVD”) — „for membership of fascist counter–revolutionary roman–catholic organisation”. Exiled to KarLag (Kazakhstan) camp. Released on 11.02.1940. Returned illegally to Zhytomyr and settled clandestinely in the attic of the house of Sisters Servants of Jesus, running their activities clandestinely from Michałówka village. Denounced and on 10.07.1940 arrested again, together with nuns that sheltered him. Held in Zhytomyr prison. On 26.10.1940 sentenced to death, commuted to 10 years of slave labour in Russian concentration camps — Gulag. On 30.04.1941 deported again to KarLag camp — together with Sr Sophia Bratkowska and Sr Eleonor Jędrzejewska, the nuns — tending to deported nuns, and perished there.

perpetrators

Russians

others related in death

BRAWER Stanislaus, JACHNIEWICZ Stanislaus, KLEMCZYŃSKI Sigismund, SZCZEPANIUK Nicholas, BRATKOWSKA Sophia, JĘDRZEJEWSKA Eleonor

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

KarLag: Russian concentration camp and forced labour camp n. Karaganda in Kazakhstan. One of the largest in Gulag penal system, operational in 1930‑59 (though even later parts of the camp were used as a new concentration camp and prison). Stretched over 300 by 200 km, centered in Dolinka village, c. 45 km from Karaganda. One of the goals was creation a large food base for the developing coal and metallurgical industries of Kazakhstan. 10,000 to 65,000 (in 1949) prisoners — including women and children many of whom perished — were held in the camp at any one time. In total over 1,000,000 inmates slaved in KarLag over its history. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2019.10.13])

Gulag: Network of Russian slave labour concentration camps. At any given time up to 12 mln inmates where held in them, milions perished. (more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.05.09], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.05.09])

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. „The war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2015.09.30])

Forced exile: One of the standard Russian forms of repression. The prisoners were usually taken to a small village in the middle of nowhere — somewhere in Siberia, in far north or far east — dropped out of the train carriage or a cart, left out without means of subsistence or place to live. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20])

Trial of 14.05.1936: Trial of 19 Catholics, including four women and eight Catholic priests: Fr Stanislaus Brawer, Fr. Stanislaus Jachniewicz, Fr Roman Jankowski, Fr Sigismunt Klemczyński, Fr Joseph Koziński, Fr Alois Schönfeld, Fr Peter Welik and Greek–Catholic Fr Nicholas Szczepaniuk, the last Catholic pastors ministering in Zhytomyr vicinity, held in Kiev. They were accused of „counter–revolutionary activities”, „remaining in touch with counter–revolutionary representative of foreign centers”, „usage of Polish national banners during religious festivities” and „membership of fascist counter–revolutionary roman–catholic and greek–catholic priests’ organization in the Western Ukraine”. The genocidal Russian summary court, so–called „Troika NKVD”, sent most for many years to Russian concentration camps Gulag. (more on: history.org.ua [access: 2019.02.02])

Kiev (Lyukyanivska): Russian political prison in Kiev run by criminal NKVD. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21])

Zhytomyr (prison): Russian investigative prison known for cruel interrogation methods used by the Russians. Execution site as well.

Polish-Russian war of 1919—20: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik–like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20])

sources

personal:
www.duszki.pl [access: 2012.11.23], www.katolicy.eu [access: 2013.05.19], biographies.library.nd.edu [access: 2014.05.09]
bibliograhical:
„Register of Latin rite Lviv metropolis clergy’s losses in 1939‑45”, Józef Krętosz, Maria Pawłowiczowa, editors, Opole, 2005
„Lexicon of Polish clergy repressed in USSR in 1939‑1988”, Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, ed. Science Society KUL, 2003, Lublin
„Fate of the Catholic clergy in USSR 1917‑39. Martyrology”, Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, ed. Science Society KUL, 2003, Lublin
original images:
www.russiacristiana.org [access: 2014.12.20], ipn.gov.pl [access: 2019.02.02]

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