• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

st Sigismund
Roman Catholic parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese
Poland

  • st SIGISMUND: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection

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WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJA
  • NOWAK Francis, source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Francis
    source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org
    own collection

surname

NOWAK

forename(s)

Francis (pl. Franciszek)

  • NOWAK Francis - Commemorative plaque, Brenno, source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Francis
    Commemorative plaque, Brenno
    source: www.wtg-gniazdo.org
    own collection
  • NOWAK Francis - Altar, Martyrs' Chapel, St Peter and St Paul cathedral, Poznań, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Francis
    Altar, Martyrs' Chapel, St Peter and St Paul cathedral, Poznań
    source: own collection
  • NOWAK Francis - Commemorative plague, altar, Martyrs' Chapel, St Peter and St Paul cathedral, Poznań, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFONOWAK Francis
    Commemorative plague, altar, Martyrs' Chapel, St Peter and St Paul cathedral, Poznań
    source: own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Gniezno and Poznań archdiocese (aeque principaliter)
more on: www.archpoznan.pl [access: 2012.11.23]
Military Ordinariate of Poland
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20]

honorary titles

„Cross of Independence”
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2019.02.02]
„Cross of Valour”
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2019.04.16]
Gold „Cross of Merit”
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2019.04.16]
Cross on the Silesian Ribbon of Valor and Merit

date and place of birth

14.09.1880

Górczyn-Poznań
Poznań city Cou., Greater Poland voiv., Poland

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

09.02.1908 (Gniezno)

positions held

parish priest of St Hedwig of Silesia in Brenno parish (1930‑40), f. parish priest of Our Lady of the Assumption parish in Kopanica in Zbąszyń deanery (1922‑30), f. administrator of St Nicholas in Lewice (1922), Skoki, St Lawrence in Chynowo (1919) parishes, f. parish priest (from 1916) and administrator (1916) of St Nicholas parish in Czeszewo (1916‑9), f. vicar of St Michael the Archangel in Rogalinek (1913‑6), All Saints in Kórnik (1908‑13), Our Lady of the Assumption in Czerlejno (1908) parishes, f. theology and philosophy student at Theological Seminary in Gniezno (till 1908) and Poznań (from 1904)

date and place of death

30.01.1942

KL Posen
concentration camp, Poznań, Poznań city Cou., Greater Poland voiv., Poland

cause of death

murder

details of death

During studies at gymnasium in Wschowa member of clandestine Polish self–educational Thomas Zan Society. After re–birth of Polish Republic in 11.1918 member of clandestine Polish Military Organisaton POW in Greater Poland. Harrased by German–Prussian authorities. On 08.12.1918 announced creation of Polish „Czeszewo Republic” and after the outbreak of Greater Poland Uprising on 27.12.1918 mobilised troops and led them from Miłosław to Września concentration center. From 12.1919 military chaplain. Took part in Polish–Russian war of 1919‑21, on Lithuanian–Belarusian front, n. Minsk and Bobruysk.Next on 15.01.1921‑05.07.1921 — specifically during III Silesian Uprising — head of the Chaplaincy at the Supreme Command of the Uprising Army in Upper Silesia. Demobilised from Polish army in 08.1921. After German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the II World War, after start of German occupation, arrested by the Germans on 28.08.1940. Jailed in Wronki prison. Next on 05.11.1940 moved to Poznań jails. Finally (prob. on 29.08.1941) moved to KL Posen (Fort VII) concentration camp where perished.

alt. dates and places of death

04.02.1941

perpetrators

Germans

others related in death

CEGIEL Thaddeus, FLACH Julian, GRAMLEWICZ Edward, HARASYMOWICZ Vincent, JANICKI Stanislaus, JANKOWSKI Alphonse, KUBIK Alexander, ŁUKOWSKI Steven, MAŁECKI Stanislaus, MANITIUS Gustave, MIROCHNA Steven Marian (Fr Julian), MZYK Louis, NIEDBAŁ Anthony Adam, PIOTROWSKI Ignatius, POPRAWSKI Marian, SĘKIEWICZ Mauritius Vaclav, STEINMETZ Paul, SZREYBROWSKI Casimir, TYMA Joseph, WIŚNIEWSKA Mary, WOŹNIAK Albin

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

KL Posen: German Posen — Fort VII — camp founded in c. 10.10.1939 in Poznań till mid of 11.1939 operated formally as KL Posen concentration camp (Germ. Konzentrationslager), and this term is used throughout the White Book, also later periods. It was first such a concentration camp set up by the Germans on Polish territory — in case of Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) directly incorporated into German Reich. In 10.1939 in KL Posen for the first time Germans used gas to murder civilian population, in particular patients of local psychiatric hospitals. From 11.1939 the camp operated as German political police Gestapo prison and transit camp (Germ. Übergangslager), prior to sending off to concentration camps, such as KL Dachau or KL Auschwitz. In 28.05.1941 the camp was rebranded as police jail and slave labour corrective camp (Germ. Arbeitserziehungslager). At its peak up to 7‑9 executions were carried in the camp per day, there were mass hangings of the prisoners and some of them were led out to be murdered elsewhere, outside of the camp. Altogether in KL Posen Germans exterminated approx. 20,000 inhabitants of Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) region, including many representatives of Polish intelligentsia, patients and staff of psychiatric hospitals and dozen or so Polish priests. Hundreds of priests were held there temporarily prior to transport to other concentration camps, mainly KL Dachau. From 03.1943 the camp had been transformed into an industrial complex (from 25.04.1944 — Telefunken factory manufacturing radios for submarines and aircrafts). (more on: www.wmn.poznan.pl [access: 2019.02.02], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.12.27])

Poznań (Młyńska str.): Detention centre run by Germans. Death sentences were carried out there, by guillotine and hanging. (more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.10.05])

Wronki: Penal prison in 1939‑45 managed by the Germans — called Strafgefüngnis Wronki — for the prisoners sentenced to 6 months to 2 years incarceration, mainly Poles. Altogether up to 28,000 inmates were held there. After 1945 it was a jail for political prisoners, “enemies” of Russian‑Polish Commie‑Nazis. (more on: www.sw.gov.pl [access: 2013.08.17], pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.08.17])

26.08.1940 arrests (Warthegau): As part of strategy formulated by the Gaulaiter of German‑occupied Wartheland, Artur Greiser, implementing „Ohne Gott, ohne Religion, ohne Priesters und Sakramenten” — „without God, without religion, without priest and sacrament” — policy, hundreds of Polish priests were arrested on this day. They were jailed, together with priests arrested previously and held in Ląd on Warta river camp, among others, in Szczeglin transit camp n. Mogilno. Three days later all were transferred to KL Sachsenhausen concentration camp.

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. „The war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2015.09.30])

Silesian Uprisings: Three armed interventions of the Polish population against Germany in 1919‑21 aiming at incorporation of Upper Silesia and Opole region into Poland, after the revival of the Polish state in 1918. Took place in the context of a plebiscite ordered on the basis of the international treaty of Versailles of 28.06.1919, ending the First World War, that was to decide national fate of the disputed lands. The 1st Uprising took place on 16‑24.08.1919 and broke out spontaneously in response to German terror and repression against the Polish population. Covered mainly Pszczyna and Rybnik counties and part of the main Upper Silesia industrial district. Suppressed by the Germans. 2nd Uprising took place on 19‑25.08.1920 in response to numerous acts of terror of the German side. Covered the entire area of the Upper Silesia industrial district and part of the Rybnik county. As a result Poles obtained better conditions for the campaign prior the plebiscite. The poll was conducted on 20.03.1921. The majority of the population — 59.6% — were in favor of Germany, but the results were influenced by the admission of voting from former inhabitants of Upper Silesia living outside Silesia. As a result the 3rd Uprising broke out, the largest such uprising of the Silesian in the 20th century. It lasted from 02.05.1921 to 05.07.1921. Spread over almost the entire area of Upper Silesia. Two large battles took place in the area of St. Anna Mountain and near Olza. As a result on 12.10.1921 the international plebiscite commission decided on a more favorable for Poland division of Upper Silesia. The territory granted to Poland was enlarged to about ⅓ of the disputed territory. Poland accounted for 50% of metallurgy and 76% of coal mines. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2020.05.25])

Polish-Russian war of 1919—20: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik–like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20])

Greater Poland Uprising: Military insurrection of Poles living in Posen Provinz (Eng. Poznań province) launched against German Reich in 1918‑9 aiming to incorporate lands captured by Prussia during partitions of Poland in XVIII century into Poland, reborn in 1918. Started on 27.12.1918 in Poznań and finished with total Polish victory on 16.02.1919 by a ceasefire in Trier. Many Polish priests took part in the Uprising, both as chaplains of the insurgents units and members and leaders of the Polish agencies and councils set up in the areas covered by the Uprising. In 1939 after German invasion of Poland and start of the II World war those priests were particularly persecuted by the Germans and majority of them were murdered. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2016.08.14])

Thomas Zan Societies: Secret societies of Polish youth, aiming at self–education, patriotic in form and content, functioning 1830‑1920, in mutiny against enforced Germanisation and censure of Polish culture, mainly in secondary schools — gymnasia — mainly in Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) and later in Silesia. The first groups were formed in 1817. In 1897 a congress in Bydgoszcz was held when rules of clandestine activities were formulated. At other congress in Bydgoszcz in Poznań a „Red Rose” society was formed, heading all others groups in various gymnasiums and coordinating their activities. In 1900 „Red Rose” consolidated Philomaths organizations from Pomerania as well. After Toruń trial of Pomeranian Philomaths in Toruń Germans arrested 24 members of Thomas Zan Society from Gniezno. 21 of them were sentenced up to 6 weeks in prison and reprimands. All were relegated from schools without the right to continue education in secondary and higher schools in Prussia. Despite repression the Societies existed till 1918 and rebirth of Poland. (more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2018.11.18])

sources

personal:
www.wtg-gniazdo.org [access: 2012.11.23], www.encyklo.pl [access: 2013.08.10], pw.ipn.gov.pl [access: 2020.05.25]
bibliograhical:
„Martyrology of the Polish Roman Catholic clergy under nazi occupation in 1939‑1945”, Victor Jacewicz, John Woś, vol. I‑V, Warsaw Theological Academy, 1977‑1981
original images:
www.wtg-gniazdo.org [access: 2012.11.23], www.wtg-gniazdo.org [access: 2012.11.23]

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