• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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st Sigismund
Roman Catholic parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese
Poland

  • st SIGISMUND: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection

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WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJA

surname

KONOPLANKO

function

priest

creed

Eastern Orthodox Church
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

nationality

Ukrainian

date and place of death

f. Dubno county
Ukraine

cause of death

murder

details of death

During the genocide perpetrated by Ukrainians, known as „Volyn genocide”: refused to bless weapons and knifes before a planned massacre of the Poles.

perpetrators

Ukrainians

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

Volyn genocide: In 1939‑47, especially in 1943‑4, independent Ukrainian units, mainly belonging to genocidal Ukrainian organizations OUN (political arm) and UPA (military arm), supported by local Ukrainian population, murdered — often in extremely brutal way — in Volyn and surrounding regions of pre‑war Poland, from 70,000 to 130,000 Poles, all civilians: men, women, children, old and young. Polish–Ukrainian conflict that openly emerged during and after I World War (in particular resulting in Polish–Ukrainian war of 1918‑9), that survived and even deepened later when western Ukraine became a part Poland, exploded again after the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. During Russian occupation of 1939‑41, when hundreds of thousands of Poles were deported into central Russia, when tens of thousands were murdered (during so‑called Katyń massacres, among others), this open conflict had a limited character, helped by the fact that at that time Ukrainians, Ukrainian nationalists in particular, were also persecuted by the Russians. The worst came after German–Russian war started on 22.06.1941 and German occupation resulted. Initially Ukrainians supported Germans (Ukrainian police was initiated, Ukrainians co—participated in extermination of the Jews and were joining army units fighting alongside Germans). Later when German ambivalent position towards Ukraine became apparent Ukrainians started acting independently. And in 1943 one of the units of aforementioned Ukrainian OUN/UPA organization, in Volyn, started and perpetrated a genocide of Polish population of this region. In mere few weeks OUN/UPA murdered, with Germans passively watching on the sidelines, more than 40,000 Poles. This strategy was consequently approved and adopted by all OUN/UPA organisations and similar genocides took place in Eastern Lesser Poland (part of Ukraine) where more than 20,000 Poles were slaughtered, meeting however with growing resistance from Polish population. Further west, in Chełm, Rzeszów, etc. regions this genocide turned into an extremely bloody conflict. In general genocide, perpetrated by Ukrainian nationalists, partly collaborating with German occupants, on vulnerable Polish population took part in hundreds of villages and small towns, where virtually all Polish inhabitants were wiped out. More than 200 priests, religious and nuns perished. This holocaust and conflict ended up in total elimination of Polish population and Polish culture from Ukraine, in enforced deportations in 1944‑5 of remaining Poles from Ukraine and some Ukrainians into Ukraine proper, and finally in deportation of Ukrainians from East‑South to the Western parts of Polish republic prl by Commie‑Nazi Russian controlled Polish security forces („Vistula Action”). (more on: wolyn1943.eu.interiowo.pl [access: 2013.12.04], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.12.04])

sources

personal:
www.kresowianie.info [access: 2013.05.19]

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