• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

st Sigismund
Roman Catholic parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese
Poland

  • st SIGISMUND: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection

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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJA
  • PERKOWICZ Eugene; source: Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, „Lexicon of Catholic clergy in USSR in 1917—1939 – Martirology”, ed. Science Society KUL, 1998, Lublin, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERKOWICZ Eugene
    source: Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, „Lexicon of Catholic clergy in USSR in 1917—1939 – Martirology”, ed. Science Society KUL, 1998, Lublin
    own collection

surname

PERKOWICZ

forename(s)

Eugene (pl. Eugeniusz)

  • PERKOWICZ Eugene - Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg, source: ipn.gov.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOPERKOWICZ Eugene
    Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg
    source: ipn.gov.pl
    own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Zhytomyr diocese
more on: www.catholic-hierarchy.org [access: 2019.02.02]

date and place of birth

1875

Kiev (Ukraine)

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

1907

positions held

f. vicar of Proskuriv parish (1922‑7), f. administrator of Tereshki parish in Starokonstantiniv deanery (from c. 1917), f. minister of Berdichiv, Neswicz, Alexandria, Uman, Bila Tserkev parishes, f. theology and philosophy student at Theological Seminary in Zhytomyr (1902‑7), f. apothecary science student at university in Kiev (till. c. 1896)

date and place of death

22.09.1938

Shemursha (Chuvashia rep., Russia)

cause of death

murder

details of death

After ordination moved from parish to parish — apparently was causing problems to his superiors. Corresponded then extensively with Communists. In 1920, during Polish–Russian war of 1919‑21, during Polish troops withdrawal from Ukraine, remained behind in his parish. Persecuted and mistreated by the Russians. In 03.01.1927 in Ukrainian „Червоний кордон” magazine informed about his abandonment of priesthood and critique of religion as „cursed inheritance of the ages gone by”. From 1927 regularly contributed anti–clerical and anti–religious articles to Polish language „Sickle” and „Youth Voice” magazines and Ukrainian language „Безвірник” (Eng. „Atheist”) magazine. For two years visited dozens of towns and villages speaking publicly about his abandonment of faith — accompanied by Russian Communist authorities. Only in 1932 though his citizens rights, withdrawn in the past — as a result of him being a Pole and Catholic priest — were granted him back. From 1931 run a pharmacy in Myrivka village in Kiev region. In 07.1933 arrested by the Russians and accused of membership of Polish Military Organisation POW and counter–revolutionary activities. For 3 month resisted by then signed forced confessions. Initially in 1934 sentenced by a criminal Russian OGPU Council kangaroo court to 5 years, changed later to 3, of deportation. Taken to Uralsk in western Kazakhstan. In 07.1937 moved to Shemursha village (Chuvashia rep.) where run a pharmacy. Finally on 03.10.1937 arrested again and accused of the same. This time resisted for 6 months but then broke down a signed a confession stating that for 16 years collaborated clandestinely with Polish POW. On 22.09.1938 tried by the genocidal Special Council NKVD kangaroo court (known as „Troika NKVD”), sentenced to death and murdered on the same day.

perpetrators

Russians

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

11.08.1937 Russian genocide: On 11.08.1937 Russian leader Stalin decided and NKWD head, Nicholas Jeżow, signed a „Polish operation” executive order no 00485. 139,835 Poles living in Russia were thus sentenced summarily to death. 111,091 were murdered. 28,744 were sentenced to deportation to concentration camps in Gulag. Altogether however more than 100,000 Poles were deported, mainly to Kazakhstan, Siberia, Kharkov and Dniepropetrovsk. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2016.03.14])

Forced exile: One of the standard Russian forms of repression. The prisoners were usually taken to a small village in the middle of nowhere — somewhere in Siberia, in far north or far east — dropped out of the train carriage or a cart, left out without means of subsistence or place to live. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20])

Polish-Russian war of 1919—20: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik–like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20])

sources

personal:
prasapolukr.ijp.pan.pl [access: 2019.05.30], www.pwin.pl [access: 2014.12.20]
bibliograhical:
„Fate of the Catholic clergy in USSR 1917‑39. Martyrology”, Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, ed. Science Society KUL, 2003, Lublin
original images:
ipn.gov.pl [access: 2019.02.02]

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