• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

st Sigismund
Roman Catholic parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese
Poland

  • st SIGISMUND: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection

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WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJA
  • SKRINDA Benedykt, source: www.mariani.lv, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSKRINDA Benedykt
    source: www.mariani.lv
    own collection
  • SKRINDA Benedykt, source: newsaints.faithweb.com, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSKRINDA Benedykt
    source: newsaints.faithweb.com
    own collection

surname

SKRINDA

forename(s)

Benedykt

function

religious cleric

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

congregation

Congregation of Marian Fathers of the Immaculate Conception of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary (Marians of the Immaculate Conception - MIC)
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.05.19]

diocese / province

Riga archdiocese
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.05.19]
Mogilev archdiocese
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.06.23]

nationality

Latvian

date and place of death

10.12.1947

Viļāni
Viļāni mun., Latvia

details of death

In 1919, during Polish–Russian war, sentenced in‑absentia by the Russians to death. Forced to hide, avoided capture. During the II World War, started by German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939, during Russian, and then German, occupation forced to leave his Congregation house in Viļāni — the building were used for military purposes. In 11.1947, after the end of the military conflict, again forced by the occupying Russians to leave his monastery — planned to be converted to a school. During eviction pushed out from his apartment by a Russian soldier who caught him by the throat and pushed breaking his neck cartilage. Lost voice, had difficulties in eating and soon perished.

cause of death

murder

perpetrators

Russians

date and place of birth

22.02.1868

Līpas Mukoni
Vabole pog., Daugavpils mun., Latvia

religious vows

1924 (temporary)

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

1903

positions held

1924–1947 — parish priest {parish: Viļāni, St Michael the Archangel}
1924–1947 — superior {Viļāni, Religious House}
c. 1936 — superior {Rēzekne, Religious House}
1923–1924 — novitiate {Marijampolė, Religious House}
from 1923 — religious {Marijampolė, Congregation's house, Congregation of Marian Fathers}
1914–1923 — parish priest {parish: Balvi, Holy Trinity}
till c. 1914 — parish priest {parish: Andrupene, Blessed Virgin Mary of the Scapular}
parish priest {parish: Bukmuiža, St Louis}
from 1907 — parish priest {parish: Juzefova, St Peter and St Paul the Apostles}
1905–1907 — vicar {parish: Sankt Petersburg, St Catherine of Alexandria}
1903–1905 — vicar {parish: Omsk}
1899–1903 — student {Sankt Petersburg, philosophy and theology, Theological Seminary}

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. „The war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2015.09.30])

Polish-Russian war of 1919—20: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik–like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20])

sources

personal:
www.mariani.lv [access: 2021.05.20], padrimariani.org [access: 2021.05.20]
original images:
www.mariani.lv [access: 2021.05.20], newsaints.faithweb.com [access: 2021.05.06]

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