• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Roman Catholic
St Sigismund parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana Str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese, Poland

  • St SIGISMUND: St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • St SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionSt SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    St Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

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  • BARANOWSKI Leonard, source: www.russiacristiana.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOBARANOWSKI Leonard
    source: www.russiacristiana.org
    own collection

surname

BARANOWSKI

forename(s)

Leonard

  • BARANOWSKI Leonard - Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg, source: ipn.gov.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOBARANOWSKI Leonard
    Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg
    source: ipn.gov.pl
    own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church RCmore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Mogilev archdiocesemore on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2013.06.23]

academic distinctions

Sacred Theology Candidate

date and place
of death

12.12.1930

Togurtoday: Kolpashevo reg., Tomsk oblast, Russia
more on
ru.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.07.16]

details of death

In 1919 during Polish–Russian war taken as a hostage (one of 11 Polish Catholic priests) in Polotsk but released.

Arrested again in Vitebsk on 04.07.1922 by the Russians, but on 21.07.1922 released.

From then on under permanent police supervision.

Finally arrested in 06.1925 in a group of Poles from Vitebsk.

Accused of „spying on behalf of international bourgeoisie” and on 26.06.1925 sentenced to 3 years of slave labour.

In the summer of 1926 transported to ITL SLON Solovetsky Islands concentration camp where slaved as a stone transport, bricklayer and watchman.

On 13.06.1928 released but exiled for 3 years to Togur village n. Tomsk (Narym region).

There despite appalling conditions ministered to exiled Catholics but contracted typhoid and perished.

cause of death

extermination

perpetrators

Russians

date and place
of birth

1875

Velizh parish?today: Velizh reg., Smolensk oblast, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.07.16]

alt. dates and places
of birth

(Vyspensk county territory)location unknown
today: Vitebsk reg., Belarus

(f. Vymno county territory)today: Vitebsk reg., Belarus
more on
evitebsk.com
[access: 2023.01.18]

presbyter (holy orders)
ordination

1900

positions held

1922 – 1925

dean — Vitebsktoday: Vitebsk reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
RC deanery

1922 – 1925

administrator — Vitebsktoday: Vitebsk reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
⋄ St Anthony RC parish ⋄ Vitebsktoday: Vitebsk reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
RC deanery

1919

parish priest — Polotsktoday: Polotsk dist., Vitebsk reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
⋄ Blessed Virgin Mary of the Rosary RC parish ⋄ Polotsktoday: Polotsk dist., Vitebsk reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
RC deanery

1914 – 1915

administrator — Kazantoday: Kazan city reg., Tatarstan rep., Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.02.04]
⋄ Exaltation of the Holy Cross RC parish

1909 – 1914

dean — Polotsktoday: Polotsk dist., Vitebsk reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
RC deanery

1909 – 1914

parish priest — Polotsktoday: Polotsk dist., Vitebsk reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
⋄ Blessed Virgin Mary of the Rosary RC parish ⋄ Polotsktoday: Polotsk dist., Vitebsk reg., Belarus
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2023.01.18]
RC deanery

1904 – 1909

vicar — Smolensktoday: Smolensk oblast, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2022.01.06]
⋄ Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish — prefect

1902 – 1904

vicar — Sankt Petersburgtoday: Saint Petersburg city, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
⋄ St Catherine of Alexandria the Virgin and Martyr RC parish ⋄ Sankt Petersburgtoday: Saint Petersburg city, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
RC deanery

1901 – 1902

vicar — Oryoltoday: Oryol oblast, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2021.09.17]
⋄ Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary RC parish

till 1901

student — Sankt Petersburgtoday: Saint Petersburg city, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
⋄ philosophy and theology, Imperial Roman Catholic Spiritual Academy (1842‐1918) — postgraduate specialised studies, crowned with the degree of Candidate of Theology

student — Sankt Petersburgtoday: Saint Petersburg city, Russia
more on
en.wikipedia.org
[access: 2020.07.31]
⋄ philosophy and theology, Metropolitan Theological Seminary

murder sites
camp 
(+ prisoner no)

Forced exile: One of the standard Russian forms of repression. The prisoners were usually taken to a small village in the middle of nowhere — somewhere in Siberia, in far north or far east — dropped out of the train carriage or a cart, left out without means of subsistence or place to live. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
)

ITL SLON: Russian Rus. Исправи́тельно‐Трудово́й Ла́герь (Eng. Corrective Labor Camp) ITL Rus. Солове́цкий ла́герь осо́бого назначе́ния Ла́герь (Eng. Solovetsky Special Purpose Camp) SLON — concentration and slave forced labor camp (within what was to become Gulag complex) — headquartered in Solovetsky Islands in Arkhangelsk Oblast. Founded on 13.10.1923 in a famous Orthodox monastery. In the 1920s, one of the first and largest concentration camps in Russia. The place of slave labor of prisoners — at forest felling, sawmills, peat extraction, fishing, loading work on the Murmansk Railway Main Line, in road construction, production of food and consumer goods, at the beginning of the construction of the White Sea ‐ Baltic canal, etc. The concept of the later system of Russian Gulag concentration camps prob. had its origins in the Solovetsky Islands camp — from there the idea spread to the camps in the area covered by the construction of the White Sea ‐ Baltic canal, i.e. ITL BelBaltLag, and from there further, to the entire territory of the Russian state. From the network of camps on the Solovetsky Islands — also called the Solovetsky Islands archipelago — prob. also comes the concept of the „Gulag Archipelago” created by Alexander Solzhenitsyn. It is estimated that tens to hundreds of thousands of prisoners passed through the Solovetsky Islands concentration camps. At its peak, c. 72,000 prisoners were held there: e.g. 14,810 (12.1927); 12,909 (03.1928); 65,000 (1929); 53,123 (01.01.1930); 63,000 (01.06.1930); 71,800 (01.01.1931); 15,130 (1932); 19,287 (1933) — c. 43,000 of whom were murdered, including the years 1937‐1938 when c. 9,500 prisoners were transported from the camp and murdered in several places of mass executions, including Sandarmokh, Krasny Bor and Lodeynoye Polye. Among them were many Catholic and Orthodox priests. After the National Socialist Party came to power in Germany in 1933, a German delegation visited the ITL SLON camp, to „inspect” Russian solutions and adopt them later in German concentration camps. It operated until 04.12.1933, with a break from 16.11.1931 to 01.01.1932, when it was part of and later became a subcamp of the ITL BelBaltLag camp. It operated as such until 1939 (from 1936 as a prison). (more on: old.memo.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2024.04.08]
)

Gulag: The acronym Gulag comes from the Rus. Главное управление исправительно‐трудовых лагерей и колоний (Eng. Main Board of Correctional Labor Camps). The network of Russian concentration camps for slave labor was formally established by the decision of the highest Russian authorities on 27.06.1929. Control was taken over by the OGPU, the predecessor of the genocidal NKVD (from 1934) and the MGB (from 1946). Individual gulags (camps) were often established in remote, sparsely populated areas, where industrial or transport facilities important for the Russian state were built. They were modeled on the first „great construction of communism”, the White Sea‐Baltic Canal (1931‐1932), and Naftali Frenkel, of Jewish origin, is considered the creator of the system of using forced slave labor within the Gulag. He went down in history as the author of the principle „We have to squeeze everything out of the prisoner in the first three months — then nothing is there for us”. He was to be the creator, according to Alexander Solzhenitsyn, of the so‐called „Boiler system”, i.e. the dependence of food rations on working out a certain percentage of the norm. The term ZEK — prisoner — i.e. Rus. заключенный‐каналоармец (Eng. canal soldier) — was coined in the ITL BelBaltLag managed by him, and was adopted to mean a prisoner in Russian slave labor camps. Up to 12 mln prisoners were held in Gulag camps at one time, i.e. c. 5% of Russia's population. In his book „The Gulag Archipelago”, Solzhenitsyn estimated that c. 60 mln people were killed in the Gulag until 1956. Formally dissolved on 20.01.1960. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2024.04.08]
)

Polish‐Russian war of 1919‐1921: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik‐like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
)

sources

personal:
biographies.library.nd.eduClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
, catholic.ruClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2016.03.14]

bibliographical:
Fate of the Catholic clergy in USSR 1917‐1939. Martyrology”, Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, ed. Science Society KUL, 2003, Lublin
original images:
www.russiacristiana.orgClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2014.12.20]
, ipn.gov.plClick to attempt to display webpage
[access: 2019.02.02]

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