• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

st Sigismund
Roman Catholic parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese
Poland

  • st SIGISMUND: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection

LINK to Nu HTML Checker

WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJA
  • SKOREL Joseph, source: episkopat.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSKOREL Joseph
    source: episkopat.pl
    own collection
  • SKOREL Joseph - 1935, Pinsk, source: polesie.org, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSKOREL Joseph
    1935, Pinsk
    source: polesie.org
    own collection

surname

SKOREL

forename(s)

Joseph (pl. Józef)

  • SKOREL Joseph - Commemorative plaque, Polish War Cemetery, Miednoye, source: www.moremaiorum.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSKOREL Joseph
    Commemorative plaque, Polish War Cemetery, Miednoye
    source: www.moremaiorum.pl
    own collection
  • SKOREL Joseph - Commemorative plaque, Our Lady Queen of the Polish Crown Field Cathedral of the Polish Army, Warsaw, source: katedrapolowa.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSKOREL Joseph
    Commemorative plaque, Our Lady Queen of the Polish Crown Field Cathedral of the Polish Army, Warsaw
    source: katedrapolowa.pl
    own collection
  • SKOREL Joseph - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSKOREL Joseph
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection
  • SKOREL Joseph - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSKOREL Joseph
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection
  • SKOREL Joseph - Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg, source: ipn.gov.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOSKOREL Joseph
    Commemorative plaque, St Stanislaus church, Sankt Petersburg
    source: ipn.gov.pl
    own collection

function

diocesan priest

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Pinsk diocese
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.05.19]
Minsk diocese
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.05.19]
Mogilev archdiocese
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.06.23]
Military Ordinariate of Poland
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20]

academic distinctions

Theology MA

date and place of death

04.1940

Tver
Tver oblast, Russia

details of death

During Polish–Russian war of 1920 chaplain of the 2. Infantry Regiment of Polish Legions. Took part in Belarus–Lithuania front campaign. After German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the World War II participant of Warsaw defense as the chaplain of Ujazdowskie hospital. Prob. before Warsaw fall left the city and attempted to move east. There on 25.12.1939arrested by the Russians. Jailed in Kozielsk concentration camp. On Christmas Eve of 24.12.1939 prob. moved to Butyrki prison in Moscow and in the spring of 1940 to Ostaszków concentration camp. From there transported to Twer execution site and brutally murdered.

cause of death

mass murder

perpetrators

Russians

date and place of birth

12.06.1893

Navahrudak
Navahrudak dist., Grodno reg., Belarus

alt. dates and places of birth

01.06.1893

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

1916 (Sankt Petersburg)

positions held

from 01.06.1919 — chaplain {Polish Army}, professional, from 01.01.1934 in the rank of major
1932–1939 — chaplain {hospital of the Sanitary Training Center, Command of the Corps District DOK No. I Warsaw, Polish Army}
prefect {Warsaw, Higher School of Engineering and Engineers}
1922–1928 — chaplain {Warsaw, 1st District Hospital}
chaplain {Grudziądz, District Hospital}
chaplain {Brest, fortress, Polish Army}
chaplain {Białystok Rifle Regiment, Polish Army}
1920 — chaplain {Polish Army}, 2nd Legions Infantry Regiment
student {Warsaw, Department of Catholic Theology, [University of Warsaw /from 1945/, University — clandestine, underground /1939‑45/, Joseph Piłsudski University /1935‑39/, University of Warsaw /1915‑35/, Imperial University of Warsaw /1870–1915/]}
1916–1918 — student {Sankt Petersburg, philosophy and theology, Imperial Roman Catholic Spiritual Academy (1842‑1918)}
till 1916 — student {Sankt Petersburg, philosophy and theology, Theological Seminary}

others related in death

DUBIEL Alexander, JANAS Mieczyslav, KACPRZAK Joseph, MARCOŃ Mieczyslav, MASŁOŃ Vladislav, MIKUCZEWSKI Joseph, MIODUSZEWSKI John, NOWAK Edmund, OCHAB Vladimir, PASZKO Richard, ROMANOWSKI Victor, SZWED Bronislaus, WOJTYNIAK Czeslav, ZAKRZEWSKI Francis

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

Twer: On 04.03—22.05.1940 Russians executed in Twer approx. 6,300 Polish prisoners of war (POW) kept in Ostaszków concentration camp. The bodies where next dumped in mass graves in ditches in the Miednoje forest. This was a fulfillment of Russian Commie–Nazi government decision — Political Bureau of the Russian Commie–Nazi party of 05.03.1940 — to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and individuals jailed in prisoners of war camps (Polish holocaust). (more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2012.11.23], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.05.09])

Ostaszków (prisoner no: 5773): In 1939‑40 in Ostaszków — in practice on Seliger lake Stołobnyj and Swietlica islands, c. 11 km from Ostaszków, in a former Orthodox monastery, Niłowo–Stołobieńska Hermitage — Russians set a concentration camp for Poles arrested after 1939 invasion of Poland. In 04.1940 6,570 were kept there out of which approx. 6,300 were subsequently — as the fulfillment of Russian government decision to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and prisoners of war camps (Polish holocaust) — executed in Twer. (more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2012.11.23])

Moscow (Butyrki): Harsh transit and interrogation prison in Moscow — for political prisoners — where Russians held and murdered thousands of Poles. Founded prob. in XVII century. In XIX century many Polish insurgents (Polish uprisings of 1831 and 1863) were held there. During Communist regime a place of internment for political prisoners prior to a transfer to Russian slave labour complex Gulag. During the Great Purge c. 20,000 inmates were held there at any time (c. 170 in every cell). Thousands were murdered. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2020.05.01])

Kozielsk: In 1939‑40 in Kozielsk Russians set a concentration camp for Poles arrested after 1939 invasion of Poland. In 04.1940 approx. 4,300 were kept there and subsequently— as the fulfillment of Russian government decision to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and prisoners of war camps (Polish holocaust) — were executed in Katyń. (more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2012.11.23])

Warsaw (Black Monday): On 25.09.1939 from 7:00 till late evening more than 400 German bombers made aerial raids on Warsaw. Almost 630 tons of explosives, both incendiary and demolishing were dropped. Caused c. 200 fires. Public building were not spared, including hospitals clearly marked with Red Cross signs (in fact they were targeted in the first place). Holy Ghost hospital was among them and c. 700 people, both patients and staff were killed (including 20 Vincentian sisters). Altogether during the raids called „Black Monday” c. 10,000 people perished, 35,000 were wounded, mostly civilian. The raids were in contravention of Hague agreements and must be regarded as an act of war crime. (more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2015.04.18])

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. „The war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken — backed up by the betrayal of the formal allies of Poland, France and Germany, which on 12.09.1939, at a joint conference in Abbeville, decided not to provide aid to attacked Poland and not to take military action against Germany (a clear breach of treaty obligations with Poland) — were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2015.09.30])

Polish-Russian war of 1919—20: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik–like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20])

sources

personal:
www.bochenia.pl [access: 2017.01.21], www.katedrapolowa.pl [access: 2014.05.09], episkopat.pl [access: 2019.10.13]
bibliograhical:
„Lexicon of Polish clergy repressed in USSR in 1939‑1988”, Roman Dzwonkowski, SAC, ed. Science Society KUL, 2003, Lublin
original images:
episkopat.pl [access: 2019.10.13], polesie.org [access: 2020.07.31], www.moremaiorum.pl [access: 2018.09.02], katedrapolowa.pl [access: 2017.01.21], www.katedrapolowa.pl [access: 2014.01.16], ipn.gov.pl [access: 2019.02.02]

LETTER to CUSTODIAN/ADMINISTRATOR

If you have an email client on your communicator/computer — such as Mozilla Thunderbird, Windows Mail or Microsoft Outlook, described at Wikipedia, among others  — try the link below, please:

LETTER to CUSTODIAN/ADMINISTRATOR

If however you do not run such a client or the above link is not active please send an email to the Custodian/Administrator using your account — in your customary email/correspondence engine — at the following address:

EMAIL ADDRESS

giving the following as the subject:

MARTYROLOGY: SKOREL Joseph

To return to the biography press below: