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    source: own collection
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st Sigismund
Roman Catholic parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese
Poland

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    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
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    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
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    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
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WHITE BOOK
Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJA

surname

MASŁOWSKI

forename(s)

Anthony (pl. Antoni)

religious forename(s)

Florian Mary (pl. Florian Maria)

  • MASŁOWSKI Anthony (Bro. Florian Mary) - Commemorative plaque, St Francis Stygmata church, Warsaw-New Town, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMASŁOWSKI Anthony (Bro. Florian Mary)
    Commemorative plaque, St Francis Stygmata church, Warsaw-New Town
    source: own collection
  • MASŁOWSKI Anthony (Bro. Florian Mary) - Commemorative plaque, St Francis Stygmata church, Warsaw-New Town, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOMASŁOWSKI Anthony (Bro. Florian Mary)
    Commemorative plaque, St Francis Stygmata church, Warsaw-New Town
    source: own collection

function

laybrother

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

congregation

Order of Friars Minor Conventual (Conventual Franciscans - OFMConv)
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.05.19]

diocese / province

Immaculate Mary province OFMConv
more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.08.18]
st Anthony of Padua and bl. James Strzemię province OFMConv
more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.08.18]

date and place of birth

15.07.1902

Bagny
Sokółka Cou., Podlaskie voiv., Poland

religious vows

05.11.1933 (last)

positions held

friar of St Anthony monastery on Foch Hill in Gdynia (1938‑9) — sacristan, f. friar of Warsaw monastery (1936‑8) — tailor, f. friar of Cracow monastery (1933‑6) — tailor, f. friar of Lviv monastery (1928‑33), in Order from 12(21).08.1928

date and place of death

1944

AL Leopard
concentration sub-camp, Plömnitz, Salzlandkreis dist., Saxony-Anhalt, Germany

cause of death

extermination

details of death

After German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the II World War, after start of German occupation, prob. arrested by the Germans on 24.10.1939 (or earlier, on 12/20.09.1939). Jailed in Gdynia and next in Neufahrwasser transit camp. From there moved to KL Stutthof concentration camp. Fate thereafter unclear. Prob. released and deported to German occupied General Governorate. Prob. settled in Cracow and then moved to Warsaw. It is possible that on 31.07.1940 visited Niepokalanów monastery (arriving from Cracow). In the first days of Warsaw Uprising was rounded by the Germans on 09.08.1944, prob. on Żytnia Str. in Warsaw district of Wola. Prob. marched off to Dulag 121 Pruszków transit camp. From there on 13.08.1944 transported, among 2,750 men, to KL Buchenwald concentration camp, as a „political” prisoner. Finally on 22.08.1944 transported — in the first such transport — to a newly opened KL Buchenwald’s sub–camp of AL Leopard (Plömnitz), where prob. slaved at Solvay factory. On 16.11.1944 was still alive. Fate thereafter unknown — prob. perished there.

alt. dates and places of death

1945

perpetrators

Germans

others related in death

ANGRYK Louis, BIEŃKOWSKI John, BLAJER Blase, BŁAŻEWSKI Ignatius, BORYSIAK John, BRODOWSKI John, DUNAJSKI Peter, FIEREK Anastasius, FITTKAU Edmund, GASIŃSKI Louis, GLISZCZYŃSKI John, GŁOWA Czeslav, HEINIG Julius, HOEFT Joseph Walter, JAKUBOWSKI John, JAMRÓG Witold (Fr Henry), JÓŹWIAK Joanna, KALISZ Casimir, KASZUBOWSKI Louis, KITZERMANN Francis, KNITTER Louis, KONEWECKI Joseph, KOTOWSKA Mary Hedwig (Alice), KRĘCKI Anastasius, LABUDA Bronislaus, LEHMANN Joseph, MOJKOWSKI Julian, MÓWIŃSKI Joseph, NIKLEWSKI Felix, OLKIEWICZ Bruno, PIÓRKOWSKI Louis, PRONOBIS Adalbert, PRZYBYSZ Francis, RACKI Czeslav, ROMPCA Leo, SARNOWSKI Robert Joseph, SUDY Charles, SZYNALEWSKI Francis Xavier, SZYPNIEWSKI Vladislav, TURZYŃSKI Theodore Emilian, UGOFOWSKI Francis, WARCZAK Augustine, WĄTRÓBSKI Adalbert, WIELEWSKI Vladislav, WILEMSKI Czeslav Casimir, WILEMSKI Paul Felix, WITKOWSKI Boleslaus, WOHLFEIL Edmund, ZAKRZEWSKI John, ZĄBEK Edmund Leopold, ŻUREK Mieczyslav

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

AL Leopard (Plömnitz): German concentration camp Außenlager Leopard in Plömnitz (and nearby Leau, Peißen, Bernburg villages and towns), a sub–camp of KL Buchenwald concentration camp. Founded on 22.08.1944 and in the first transport on this day filled in with Polish political prisoners arrested during Warsaw Uprising, among others. Prisoners had to slave at concrete production in Solvay factory.

KL Buchenwald (prisoner no: 72081): In KL Buchenwald concentration camp, founded in 1937 and operational till 1945, Germans held c. 238,380 prisoners and murdered approx. 56,000 of them, among them thousands of Poles. Prisoners were victims of pseudo–scientific experiments, conducted among others by Behring–Werke from Marburg and Robert Koch Institute from Berlin companies. They slaved for Gustloff in Weimar and Fritz–Sauckel companies manufacturing armaments. To support Erla–Maschinenwerk GmbH in Leipzig, Junkers in Schönebeck (airplanes) and Rautal in Wernigerode Germans organized special sub–camps. In 1945 there were more than 100 such sub–camps. Dora concentration camp was initially one of them, as well as KL Ravensbrück sub–camps (from 08.1944). On 08.04.1945 Polish prisoner, Mr Guido Damazyn, used clandestinely constructed short wave transmitter to sent, together with a Russian prisoner, a short message begging for help. It was received and he got a reply: „KZ Bu. Hold out. Rushing to your aid. Staff of Third Army” (American). Three days later the camp was liberated. (more on: www.buchenwald.de [access: 2013.08.10], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.08.10])

DL 121 Pruszków: Durchgangslager 121 Pruszków (Eng. transit camp) – transit camp where Germans herded Warsaw (and its vicinity) civilian population captured during and after Warsaw Uprising. Set up on 06.01.1944 functioned till 12.1944. C. 390,000–410,000 people were held captive. Most of them were sent subsequently to concentration camps and forced slave labour in Germany. Few hundred – few thousands of them perished in the camp. (more on: pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2015.03.01])

Warsaw Uprising: Lasted from 01.08.1944 till 03.10.1944. Was an attempt to liberate Polish capital from occupying Germans by the Polish Clandestine State — a unique in the history of the world political structure on the territories occupied by the Germans, effectively governing clandestinely in Poland — and by fighting on its behalf underground military units, mainly of Home Army (former Armed Struggle Association ZWZ) and National Armed Forced (NSZ). At the same time Russians stopped on purpose the offensive on all front, halted on the other bank of Vistula river and watched calmly the annihilation of the city, refusing even the mid–landing rights to the Allied planes carrying weapons and supplies to the insurgents from Italy. During the Uprising Germans murdered approx. 200,000 Poles, mainly civilians. Approx. 200 priests and nuns died in fighting or were murdered by the Germans, many in mass executions. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.08.17])

General Governorate: A separate administrative territorial region set up by the Germans in 1939 after defeat of Poland, which included German‑occupied part of Polish territory that was not directly incorporate into German state. It was run by the Germans till 1945 and final Russian offensive, and was a part of so–called Big Germany — Grossdeutschland. Till 31.07.1940 formally known as Germ. Generalgouvernement für die besetzten polnischen Gebiete (Eng. General Governorate for occupied Polish territories) — later as simply niem. Generalgouvernement (Eng. General Governorate). From 07.1941 expanded to include district Galicia. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.12.04])

KL Stutthof: In KL Stutthof (then in Eastern Prussian belonging to Germany, today: Sztutowo village) concentration camp, that Germans started to build on 02.09.1939, a day after German invasion of Poland and start of the II World War, Germans held c. 100‑127 thousands prisoners from 28 countries, including 47 thousands women and children. C. 65,000 victims were murdered and exterminated. In the period of 25.01–27.04.1945 in the face of approaching Russian army Germans evacuated the camp. When on 09.05.1945 Russians soldiers entered the camp only 100 prisoners were still there. In an initial period (1939‑40) Polish Catholic priests from Pomerania were held captive there before being transported to KL Dachau concentration camp. Some of them were murdered in KL Stutthof or vicinity (for instance in Stegna forest). Also later some Catholic priests were held in KL Stutthof. (more on: stutthof.org [access: 2018.11.18], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2013.07.06])

Neufahrwasser: Neufahrwasser (Gdańsk — Nowy Port) was a transit camp organised by the Germans in 1939 for Polish prisoners, chiefly as a part of „Intelligenzaktion” — extermination of Polish intelligentsia in Pomerania. Z Neufahrwasser prisoners were being sent to KL Stutthof concentration camp or directly to execution sites. The camp was closed in 04.1940. (more on: stutthof.org [access: 2013.08.10], ofiaromwojny.republika.pl [access: 2013.12.04])

Intelligenzaktion: (Eng. „Action Intelligentsia”) — extermination program of Polish elites, mainly intelligentsia, executed by the Germans right from the start of the occupation in 09.1939 till around 05.1940, mainly on the lands directly incorporated into Germany but also in the so‑called General Governorate where it was called AB‑aktion. During the first phase right after start of German occupation of Poland implemented as Germ. Unternehmen „Tannenberg” (Eng. „Tannenberg operation”) — plan based on proscription lists of Poles worked out by (Germ. Sonderfahndungsbuch Polen), regarded by Germans as specially dangerous to the German Reich. List contained names of c. 61,000 Poles. Altogether during this genocide Germans methodically murdered c. 50,000 teachers, priests, landowners, social and political activists and retired military. Further 50,000 were sent to concentration camps where most of them perished. (more on: stutthof.org [access: 2013.08.10], ofiaromwojny.republika.pl [access: 2013.12.04], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.10.04])

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. „The war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2015.09.30])

sources

personal:
work.brp.pl [access: 2012.12.28], www.franciszkanie.gdansk.pl [access: 2013.02.09], repozytorium.ceon.pl [access: 2017.03.24]
bibliograhical:
„Martyrology of the Polish Roman Catholic clergy under nazi occupation in 1939‑1945”, Victor Jacewicz, John Woś, vol. I‑V, Warsaw Theological Academy, 1977‑1981
„Biographical–bibliographical dictionary of Polish Conventual Franciscan Fathers murdered and tragically dead in 1939‑45”, Lukas Janecki, Franciscan Fathers’ Publishing House, Niepokalanów, 2016
Ms Bianka Geißler, International Tracing Service (ITS), Bad Arolsen, Germany (Archiv‑Nr. 8611), private correspondence, 11.04.2019

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