• OUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionOUR LADY of CZĘSTOCHOWA
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
link to OUR LADY of PERPETUAL HELP in SŁOMCZYN infoSITE LOGO

st Sigismund
Roman Catholic parish
05-507 Słomczyn
85 Wiślana str.
Konstancin deanery
Warsaw archdiocese
Poland

  • st SIGISMUND: st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection
  • st SIGISMUND: XIX c., feretory, st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland; source: own collectionst SIGISMUND
    XIX c., feretory
    st Sigismund parish church, Słomczyn, Poland
    source: own collection

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Martyrology of the clergy — Poland

XX century (1914 – 1989)

personal data

review in:

link do KARTY OSOBOWEJ - POLSKA WERSJA
  • KAŁAS Edmund, source: www.meczennicy.pelplin.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKAŁAS Edmund
    source: www.meczennicy.pelplin.pl
    own collection
  • KAŁAS Edmund, source: www.meczennicy.pelplin.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKAŁAS Edmund
    source: www.meczennicy.pelplin.pl
    own collection
  • KAŁAS Edmund - Contemporary image, source: poslaniecmsf.pl, own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKAŁAS Edmund
    Contemporary image
    source: poslaniecmsf.pl
    own collection

religious status

Servant of God

surname

KAŁAS

forename(s)

Edmund

  • KAŁAS Edmund - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKAŁAS Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection
  • KAŁAS Edmund - Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw, source: own collection; CLICK TO ZOOM AND DISPLAY INFOKAŁAS Edmund
    Commemorative plaque, military field cathedral, Warsaw
    source: own collection

function

religious cleric

creed

Latin (Roman Catholic) Church
more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

congregation

Congregation of the Holy Family Missionaries (Missionaries of the Holy Family - MSF)
more on: fr.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.09.21]

diocese / province

Polish Catholic Mission in France
MSF Polish Province

date and place of birth

15.02.1899

Wierzchucin Królewski (Bydgoszcz county)

alt. dates and places of birth

15.01.1899

religious vows

08.09.1927 (last)

presbyter (holy orders)/
ordination

13.06.1932 (Poznań cathedral)

positions held

chaplain of Polish émigrés in France (from 1938) — in Rossieres, Montlucon, Alvignac, Briey (from 1939), f. chaplain at French internment camp in Livron, part of Caylus camp, for Polish soldiers stranded in France after German attack in 06.1940 on France (from 1940), f. novice master and 1st provincial assistant in Górka Klasztorna (1935‑8), f. prefect and Latin professor in Lower Theological Seminary in Wieluń (c. 1932‑5), in Congregation from 1926, f. employee of Regional Court in Bydgoszcz (1923‑6)

date and place of death

07.06.1943

KL Mauthausen

cause of death

murder

details of death

During I World War drafted in 1916 into German (Prussian) army. Took part in battles on the Western Front, in Verdun, among others. Twice wounded. Survived gas attack. After rebirth of Poland soldier of the Polish Army. Participant of Polish–Russian war of 1920. Demobilised in 05.1921. After German and Russian invasion of Poland in 09.1939 and start of the II World War arrested prob. at the beginning of 1943 by the Germans in Rosières (Lunery, Cher dep., France) for being a courier for the „Visigoths–Lorraine”, French–Polish clandestine resistance organisation, focusing mainly on smuggling Polish soldiers stranded in France to Spain and next to Great Britain, and distribution of Polish Primate Card. August Hlond’s „Le Delfi” brochure describing German atrocities in German occupied Poland. Jailed in Bourges and Compiegne prisons. Next on 22.04.1943 transferred to KL Mauthausen concentration camp (part of KL Mauthausen–Gusen concentration camps’ complex). After „quarantine” completed on 25.05.1943 slaved in quarries. Martyr in defence of the faith: during roll–call refused to proclaim Adolf Hitler a god. Cruelly beaten up by German guards. Taken to the camp’s „hospital”, where perished.

perpetrators

Germans

others related in death

BYTOŃSKI Felix, DORSZ Bruno, FEDOROWICZ Czeslav, GIELEC Emil Vladislav, GRZĄDKA Hippolytus, KRUPIŃSKI Marian, KRZYSZKOWSKI Czeslav, MAKIELA Theodore Francis, ROGACZEWSKI Adalbert Theophilus, SIBILSKI Julian, WARTAŁOWICZ Alexander (Fr Boleslaus)

murder sites
camps (+ prisoner no)

KL Mauthausen (prisoner no: 28187): „Grade III” (niem. „Stufe III”) camp, part of KL Mauthausen–Gusen complex, intended for the „Incorrigible political enemies of the Reich”. The prisoners slaved at a nearby granite quarry, but also in local private companies. Set up in 08.1938 initially served as a prison camp for common criminals, prostitutes and other categories of „Incorrigible Law Offenders”, but on 08.05.1939 was converted into a labour camp for political prisoners. (more on:  en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.03.10])

KL Mauthausen-Gusen: A large group of German concentration camps set up around the villages of Mauthausen and Gusen in Upper Austria, c. 30 km east of Linz, operational from 1938 till 05.1945. Over time it became of the largest labour camp complexes in the German–controlled part of Europe encompassing four major camps concentration camps (Mauthausen, Gusen I, Gusen II and Gusen III) and more than 50 sub–camps where inmates slaved in quarries (the granite extracted, previously used to pave the streets of Vienna, was intended for a complete reconstruction of major German towns according to Albert Speer plans), munitions factories, mines, arms factories and Me 262 fighter–plane assembly plants. The complex served the needs of the German war machine and also carried out extermination through labour. Initially did not have a its own gas chamber and the intended victims were mostly moved to the infamous Hartheim Castle, 40.7 km east, or killed by lethal injection and cremated in the local crematorium. Later a van with the exhaust pipe connected to the inside shuttled between Mauthausen and Gusen. In 12.1941 a permanent gas chamber was built. C. 122,000‑360,000 of prisoners perished. Many Polish priests were held, including those captured during the program of extermination of Polish intelligentsia („Intelligenzaktion”). The camp complex was founded and run as a source for cheap labour for private enterprise. (more on:  en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.03.10], en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.03.10])

Ribbentrop-Molotov: Genocidal Russian–German alliance pact between Russian leader Joseph Stalin and German leader Adolf Hitler signed on 23.08.1939 in Moscow by respective foreign ministers, Mr. Vyacheslav Molotov for Russia and Joachim von Ribbentrop for Germany. The pact sanctioned and was the direct cause of joint Russian and German invasion of Poland and the outbreak of the II World War in 09.1939. „The war was one of the greatest calamities and dramas of humanity in history, for two atheistic and anti–Christian ideologies — national and international socialism — rejected God and His fifth Decalogue commandment: Thou shall not kill!” (Abp Stanislaus Gądecki, 01.09.2019). The decisions taken were on 28.09.1939 slightly altered and made more precise when a treaty on „German–Russian boundaries and friendship” was agreed by the same murderous signatories. One of its findings was establishment of spheres of influence in Central and Eastern Europe and in consequence IV partition of Poland. In one of its secret annexes agreed, that: „the Signatories will not tolerate on its respective territories any Polish propaganda that affects the territory of the other Side. On their respective territories they will suppress all such propaganda and inform each other of the measures taken to accomplish it”. The agreements resulted in a series of meeting between two genocidal organization representing both sides — German Gestapo and Russian NKVD when coordination of efforts to exterminate Polish intelligentsia and Polish leading classes (in Germany called Intelligenzaktion, in Russia took the form of Katyń massacres) where discussed. Resulted in deaths of hundreds of thousands of Polish intelligentsia, including thousands of priests presented here, and tens of millions of ordinary people,. The results of this Russian–German pact lasted till 1989 and are still in evidence even today. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2015.09.30])

Polish-Russian war of 1919—20: War for independence of Poland and its borders. Poland regained independence in 1918 but had to fight for its borders with former imperial powers, in particular Russia. Russia planned to incite Bolshevik–like revolutions in the Western Europe and thus invaded Poland. Russian invaders were defeated in 08.1920 in a battle called Warsaw battle („Vistula river miracle”, one of the 10 most important battles in history, according to some historians). Thanks to this victory Poland recaptured part of the lands lost during partitions of Poland in XVIII century, and Europe was saved from the genocidal Communism. (more on: en.wikipedia.org [access: 2014.12.20])

sources

personal:
pl.wikipedia.org [access: 2012.11.23], misjonarzemsf.pl [access: 2018.10.04], www.gedenkstaetten.at [access: 2018.10.04], www.hagiographycircle.com [access: 2012.11.23]
original images:
www.meczennicy.pelplin.pl [access: 2013.05.19], www.meczennicy.pelplin.pl [access: 2013.05.19], poslaniecmsf.pl [access: 2017.11.07], www.katedrapolowa.pl [access: 2014.01.16]

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